Thursday, April 21, 2016

The Best Book of 7th Grade Speech

Our next speech should be a fun one; what is the best book you have read in 7th grade?  Use your persuasive skills to convince people to read your book or add it to their To-Be-Read list.  How do you do this?
You need to 

  • Use a catchy beginning to capture their attention
  • Give enough detail so that they know what the book is about but not give it away
  • Have the title and author in your speech
  • Use between 1 and 2 minutes for your speech
  • Practice!
You can
  • Use a visual behind you to help support your book
  • Use an excerpt from the book as part of your presentation
Due:  Friday, April 29th.

Assessed:  Summative on standard 7. 

Sunday, April 10, 2016

A Standards Review Unit

Name:

My Plan for Reviewing the Standards

By the end of 7th grade you should have mastered the following things:

Standard
Official language
Student Language
ELA 1:
Determine/analyze development of central ideas/themes in a text.
Decide or figure out and add your own thoughts as evidence about the main ideas of the text and the theme.
ELA 2:
Analyze how story elements interact.
Interpret/analyze and put in your own words how things such as conflict, theme, tough questions, and other things affect the story.
ELA 3:
Write informative texts to convey ideas; select, organize, and analyze content; summarize.
Write informational text to show your ideas/thoughts, select, organize and interpret (put into your words) the information.  Summarize.
ELA 4:
Write narratives to share real events, using vivid detail and ordered sequence.
Write stories to share real events, using powerful details and an order of events that makes sense.
ELA 5:
Draw evidence from texts to support written analysis.
Pull out text evidence that supports the thoughts/topic you are writing about.

So for the next 8 days, you will be choosing how you want to review these standards.  That means that you create or select options for reviewing them.  Under each standard you will find several option to select from to help you review.  Think about where your biggest needs are and what you would like to do.






Pick one choice for each standard, every day you will hand in what you have worked on.

Standard 1: Determine/analyze development of central ideas/themes in a text.
Standard 2: Analyze how story elements interact.
Standard 3:
Write informative texts to convey ideas; select, organize, and analyze content; summarize.
Standard 4:
Write narratives to share events, using vivid detail and ordered sequence.
Standard 5: Draw evidence from texts to support written analysis. (will be assessed along with your standard 1 and 2 choices).
Choice 1
Create your own task - must be approved by Mrs. Ripp
Create your own task - must be approved by Mrs. Ripp
Create your own task - must be approved by Mrs. Ripp
Create your own task - must be approved by Mrs. Ripp
Create your own task - must be approved by Mrs. Ripp
Choice 2
Work in small group with a teacher.
Work in small group with a teacher.
Work in small group with a teacher.
Work in small group with a teacher.
Work in small group with a teacher.
Choice 3
Using picture books, write a MEL-Con to analyze the theme and how that theme is developed throughout the story.  2 paragraphs at least either typed or handwritten.
Create a video discussing the story elements of your independent reading book.  Story elements include: characters, setting, plot, conflict, and resolution.  To see more get the handout from Mrs. Ripp.
Create a 10 slide presentation on a topic either studied in geography or science.  
Write your best draft of a short story.
Using picture books, write a MEL-Con to analyze the theme and how that theme is developed throughout the story.  2 paragraphs at least either typed or handwritten.
Choice 4
Using self selected poetry, write a MEL-Con to analyze the theme and how that theme is developed throughout the story.  2 paragraphs at least either typed or handwritten.
Write a short essay discussing the story elements of your independent reading book.  Story elements include: characters, setting, plot, conflict, and resolution.  To see more get the handout from Mrs. Ripp.
Pick a news topic and create a current even write up.

Using self selected poetry, write a MEL-Con to analyze the theme and how that theme is developed throughout the story.  2 paragraphs at least either typed or handwritten.
Choice 5
Using your independent reading book, write a MEL-Con to analyze the theme and how that theme is developed throughout the story.  2 paragraphs at least either typed or handwritten.
Write a detailed discussion of how the conflict and resolution is developed throughout your independent reading book.
Pick a topic studied in geography or science and create an infographic with sources.

Using your independent reading book, write a MEL-Con to analyze the theme and how that theme is developed throughout the story.  2 paragraphs at least either typed or handwritten.


To see the official Google Doc for this, go here 

Tuesday, March 15, 2016

An Update from English

Our room has been a cacophony of noise this week as students rehearse and prepare for their final speech of the 3rd quarter; our Elephant and Piggie plays.  These plays are filmed and then sent out to classrooms around the world so that younger students can give our actors feedback.  Videos are shared securely, however, if a child does not have permission to have their image/work shared over the internet, their video will not be shared and feedback will just be provided with me.  Most performances will be Thursday.

Our second to last book orders are due tomorrow.
Shop Online: scholastic.com/readingclub
One-Time Class Activation Code: GXJ8R To order books either send in a check or do it online.

Great books to read include:
Echo by Pam Munoz Ryan
New Mike Lupica Book called The Extra Yard
Babysitters Club graphic Novels by Raina Telgemeier
The Blackthorn Key by Kevin Sands
This Side of Wild by Gary Paulsen
Goodbye Stranger by Rebecca Stead
Pride and Prejudice and Zombies by Jane Austen and Seth Grahame Smith
Everything Everything by Nicola Yoon
Pax by Sara Pennypacker
Jack by Liesl Shurtliff
Soar by Joan Bauer
Amulet Book 7 by Kazu Kabuishi

I so appreciate the orders placed as it allows me to buy more books for our classroom library.

Reading over spring break:
All students are expected to read over spring break and we have partnered with the Madison Mallards to give the kids a reward for their reading.  If they read 3 hours or more total and you sign their green form, they will be given 2 Mallards tickets for a game this summer.  This is a great way for students to get a little extra bonus from the reading they already do.

An update on my writing
​I have started writing my next book, this one is on literacy, and may feature student work and quotes in the book.  I will, of course, ask your permission to feature any work or quotes in it before it is placed in the book.  I am excited that I get to share the great thoughts of the students with a larger audience.



Monday, February 15, 2016

Alert; Rather than the Signpost Project

This morning I spent most of class checking in with students regarding their signpost project and realized that there was quite a bit of confusion.  After pondering and speaking to the students further,  we decided to change the project drastically to ensure that students knew what they were being asked to do as well as to make it more manageable.  So the following two projects replace the signpost project - please note the new due dates.  I apologize for any confusion this may cause but will definitely speak to the students about it tomorrow as well.

Both new assignments have been posted in Google Classroom for the students to see.

Rather than the signpost project


The goal:  To analyse a text with the help of the signposts and share your thinking in writing.


Process:
Step 1:  Find as many signposts in your book as possible
Step 2:  Try to find signposts that give you clues about the conflict and the theme of the story
Step 3:  Write the following assignments
  1. Conflict assignment - due February 23rd on Google Classroom
  2. Theme assignment - Due March 2nd on Google Classroom.

Re-take
If you receive less than a 3 or a 4 on either of those, you will have another project due later in March to re-check your understanding.


Conflict Signpost Assignment:
  • Write 1 to 2 paragraphs detailing the central conflict in your book club book.  
  • Make sure to use the evidence from the signposts you have found such as any tough questions or contrast and contradictions.  
  • Please write it with a main idea, evidence and link (analysis) of why this is the conflict.
  • Turn in on Google Classroom under “Conflict Signpost Project” by February 23rd.


Theme Signpost Assignment:
  • Write 1 to 2 paragraphs detailing the central theme in your book club book.  If you have more than 1, just pick the biggest one in your opinion.  
  • Make sure to use the evidence from the signposts you have found such as any Aha Moments or Words of the Wiser.
  • Please write it with a main idea, evidence and link (analysis) of why this is the conflict.
  • Turn in on Google Classroom under “Theme Signpost Project” by March 2nd.


Helpful Hints:
  • You can discuss the conflict and theme in your book clubs, this way you can check your own ideas for understanding.
  • Find the signposts that will give you clues to what the theme or conflict is; if in doubt ask questions to your group of Mrs. Ripp.
  • Use reflection time in class to work on the project, you can start analysing the signposts in class.


Standards Assessed - Both are summative:
Conflict Assignment:


ELA 2:
Analyze how story elements interact.

ELA 5:
Draw evidence from texts to support written analysis.

ELA 6:
Command the conventions of standard English grammar, usage, and vocabulary.

Theme Assignment:


ELA 1
Determine/analyze development of central ideas/themes in a text.
ELA 5:
Draw evidence from texts to support written analysis.
ELA 6:
Command the conventions of standard English grammar, usage, and vocabulary.


Wednesday, February 10, 2016

7-O and Global School Play Day #GSPD

On Friday, February 5th, all 140 7-O students participated in the global event Global School Play Day.  With more than 177,000 students around the world embracing the idea of unstructured play, the students had a wonderful opportunity to play games, have fun, and build community.   As you can see it was a great time for the students and a great reminder that play does not always have to be planned, nor be on a device.
















Signpost Project for Notice and Note




You have learned about the 6 signposts from the Notice and Note curriculum throughout the year and it is now time to review and further our thinking.  Part of your book club project will therefore be to create a signpost project.    

Here are some choices for the Signpost Project:

  1. Make a signpost Mind Map poster
  2. Write a signpost paper—One Book: 6 Signposts
  3. Find the 6 Signposts in picture books.
  4. Your choice - must be approved by Mrs. Ripp


Each signpost project will include the following:
  1. At least 3 of the 6 different signposts must be found and discussed, but 6 examples altogether must be found.  
  2. A paragraph for each signpost found, so altogether 6 paragraphs.  These paragraphs will include:
    1. The definition for the signpost.
    2. The anchor question for the signpost.
    3. A specific text example for the signpost.  Summarize the text example, answer the anchor question, and analyze the author’s use of the signpost. (Why is the moment important?).  

Standards Covered:
Standard #1:  Determine/Analyze development of central ideas/themes in a text
Standard #2:  Analyze how story elements interact.
Standard #5:  Draw evidence from texts to support written analysis
Standard #6:  Command the conventions of standard English grammar, usage, and vocabulary.


Examples:
An example of a paragraph is attached here, as well as presented in class.
The example papers can be found here
The examples of mind map posters can be found here

Timeline:
The completed project will be due Monday, March 7th (no work time in class during the final week).




Paragraph Example
Mrs. Vandermause
Hr. 8

The 6 Signposts in Freak, the Mighty

Contrasts and Contradictions
Contrasts and Contradictions occur when a character says or does something opposite of what he/she has been saying or doing all along.  When a reader spots a Contrast and Contradiction, he/she should ask, why is the character doing that?  By answering the anchor question, the reader will be making a prediction about characterization or plot.
In Freak, the Mighty, there are several examples of Contrasts and Contradictions.   For instance, Max’s father, Kenny Kane, says one thing, but acts in a completely different manner.  He tells Max that he had his life stolen, and that he’s the real victim.  Moreover, Kenny claims to be a gentle soul who is wrongly accused because of his size.  Conversely, Kenny ties Max to a boiler and tries to strangle Loretta Lee.  These certainly don’t seem like the actions of a “gentle soul.”  Perhaps Kenny wanted Max to believe in his good nature, but Kenny’s true colors came out through his actions.






Tuesday, February 2, 2016

Welcome to Our Blogging Adventure!

It was a great day today in 7-O English as the students became bloggers.  Please take a moment to read their introduction posts and leave them a comment.  A lot of time and effort were placed into many of these posts.  I have loved reading them all and learning more about the students as we start this next adventure.

To read their posts, please go here.